Everett Artwalk | Sept Artist | Debbie McCoy

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Debbie McCoy, our Featured Everett Art Walk Artist for September.
A Potter, Teacher and Painter.

“Clay connects me to the earth and makes me feel centered. Clay is a gift the earth gives us that allows us unlimited free expression. Being creative is a very necessary human trait, which can free our spirit and connect us to generations of humans who have found clay to be just as inspiring. Almost every day, clay is a part of my life. I am either seeing shapes, lines or textures in nature to be used in my future pieces, or actively constructing clay vessels by hand or on the wheel. Many of the techniques I use are similar to peoples in our ancient cultures. I prefer the irregular hand modeled pieces, or will alter in some way the wheel thrown pieces so they are less perfect and a bit irregular in shape. Textures are the jewelry on the piece. I fire my pottery in a variety of ways, but prefer the ancient methods such as Japanese Raku or Saggar firing. Both of these methods employ direct interaction of the potter with fire. With Raku, the pieces are lifted from the fire at about 1800 degrees F and placed in combustible material such as straw or sawdust. The glazed pieces react pieces react with the carbon produced from the burning materials as the pot quickly cools, making wonderful iridescent effects.

Saggar firing uses fire to affect the clay surface directly in the firing. There are no glazes, just the natural colors the polished clay picks up from the carbon in the firing.

Both these methods of firing can be very unpredictable but the effects are highly varied and therefore makes them unique. My ladies’ masks are my most recent exploration. I’m having great fun with facial expressions and various added decorations to make each one unique.

Teaching is my second love. I taught high school ceramics and sculpture for 28 years in the public schools of Washington State, as well as small workshops for teachers. I have exhibited my work, pottery, paintings, and block prints at various galleries around the northwest and at private showings. I also painted stage sets for live theater for 10 seasons. My block prints were the featured artwork for the posters for the Everett Women’s Film Festival for ten years, 1998 to 2008. I do not strive to be a mass producer of art. I instead choose to live an artful life,allowing my artistic endeavors to fuel my desire to create. I am a vessel myself, filled with inspiration from nature, making my own one-of-a-kind pieces. I hope you will enjoy them.

Pottery lesson from Debbie McCoy: What is sagger firing?

Firing pottery using the sagger process involves surrounding the pottery with a variety of burnable materials which cause interesting effects on the clay wall. The pottery can be encased in another pot (which is the sagger pot)and filled with burnable materials, or simply wrapped with combustibles in foil. Experimentation allows the artist to achieve a variety of results on each piece. These pieces are fired to about 1800 degrees in a gas kiln. Though fired very hot, the clay does not become water tight, or vitreous. These pieces are more for ornamentation, though they have been waxed so that they can be cleaned with a quick rinse. All pieces are safe for dry foods such as nuts. Pottery of this nature should be enjoyed for a lifetime.”

Thank you so much for the art lesson Mrs. McCoy!

Debbie’s beautiful pottery, along with the amazing astrophotograpy of Karen Heistand will be on display here at Solie all month. Please stop by and check out their incredible works Join us at our next Art Walk on Thursday September 21,2017 from 6pm-10pm and meet the artists. We also will be featuring the black light art of Meghan McSwain. Refreshments and beautiful art await you! Hope to see you then!

If you are interested in showcasing your art or music at Solie Funeral Home for Everett Artwalk please contact us at: Holly@soliefunerals.com
Art Curator/Author: Corianne Jensen

Karen Heistand-Astro Photographer

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Our August 2017 Featured Artist is Karen Heistand.

 

The Art of K

Astro Photography

Shortly after the sun sets, throughout the night and into the morning of the sun’s new light

Stars and planets twinkle, colors brought in radiant splendor unto the eye that has sought

Through scope and cell, tracing patterns of star’s divine time to tell

Today and tomorrow their presence is known, in dark or light their guidance is shone

Seeing skies curving arc as we and they progress in our lives constant march

Stars and planets like a vast community as they reflect our own social unity

Some of us seem cold, each of us is warm, with tranquil waters or with a raging storm

Even though some are close and some are distant, whispers from the skies are persistent

 

Each of Karen’s photographs are of planetary bodies that she records using her cell phone and telescope. She enjoys watching the rotations of the moons by Jupiter, the tilt of Saturn’s rings and the changing curve of our moon’s phases. Often, her husband, Justin joins her for star gazing and they delight in heaven’s celestial splendor. Many of Karen’s photographs and drawings have songs from artists that she feels compliments and resonates with her experiences.

 

Karen would like to thank everyone that has contributed to this wonderful journey through life’s twists and turns. Holly Mattie for opening doors, her Mom & Dad for supporting her every day and the beauty of Snohomish County’s many gifts. There are so many ways of enriching one’s world in inspiring places with wonderful people. Perhaps everyone is looking for a happy purpose in life and we can unify under a sky of guiding lights.

~the hunting party – until it’s gone~

 

Vibrant art livens up Everett funeral home and crematory

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Read the Everett Herald Cover Story Here:

Holly Mattie, operations manager for Solie, sees pairing a mortuary with the arts as a match made in heaven. Nobody wants to think about death or funerals. Half of our challenge is to help break down that barrier so people can feel comfortable talking about it.”

 

 

Everett Art Walk June 2017

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Solie Funeral Home was excited to once again participate in the Everett Art Walk on May 18, 2017. We featured the amazing, beautiful works of Janie Whited and Evelyn G. Sheffer.  Next month, on June 15,2017 from 6pm-10pm we will feature different artists, including Meghan McSwain. She wrote the following biography.

 

“My passion for art started when I was a little. I was surrounded by many different forms of art. My father and aunt helped me see through a camera lens. I was taken to the museums to appreciate what other’s created. I started with writing, it seemed the easiest way to create. When I became a teenager, with an old soul, I dived deep into music and the psychedelic era. Even though it was the time of Soundgarden and Nirvana. There was just something about black lights and neon paint that screamed to me to be created. My mother allowed me to paint on the walls, so I painted my mural to drive away the blues of being a teenager. I took a long break after that from painting. I figured it was just the sign of the times for me. A few years ago, I came under some health issues that laid me up for a bit. Not doing what I wanted was driving me crazy. I would find myself walking through the art section of the stores. Finally, I just dove into the idea of picking up the paint brush. Knowing I would have to play around with the colors and the glow paint, I set off to just create whatever came to me. I’m grateful that I did pick up painting again, it really helped me through that rough patch.

 

When I am about to start a painting, I call on my muse for inspiration and put on some groovy tunes. Flip the switch on the black light and it’s time to play. Some come forth with just an idea and for me to follow through to get the juices flowing. Others will take time to incubate, coming together in pieces. I do not believe that I have a certain genre that I portray or a certain influence. I let whatever comes forth – come to fruition. I get really excited whatever I create. The most time consuming point in my process is the depth of color and to make sure it glows right. I am working on a new process of invoking my intuition before I start painting. I’m excited to see what comes of these new creations of mine.” Meghan McSwain

 

Check back for more information on additional artists that will be featured here next month. Hope to see you here on June 15, 2017 from 6pm-10pm for the June Everett Art Walk!  If you are interested in showcasing your art or music at Solie Funeral Home llc for Everett Artwalk please contact us.  Curator/Author: Corianne Jensen

 

 

In your service,
Holly Mattie

Funeral Director

Our Second Ikebana Sr. Class

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Free Class for Seniors! Learn to create a one of a kind floral design using the Ikebana Japanese floral design style. Ikebana, one of the traditional arts of Japan, has been practiced for more than 600 years. It developed from the Buddhist ritual of offering flowers to the spirits of the dead. Join us to chat, snack, and create! Free to all seniors. Presented by the staff and In-house Floral Designers at Solie Funeral Home in Everett. Serving our community, Solie Funeral Flowersfriends and families for over 70 years.

Everett Art Walk

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Solie Funeral Home and Crematory is happy to announce that we are participating in the Everett Art Walk every 3rd Thursday.

At our first Art Walk, on April 20,2017 we are featuring art by Evelyn Sheffer and Janie Whited.

Artist Janie Whited says in her biography “As long as I can remember, I’ve been an artist. Growing up in a microscopic Missouri town, for lack of anything to do, I spent a lot of time in the trees. I didn’t recognize my connection to trees until I moved to the Denver area. On the Eastern side of the Rockies, the horizon often disappears into the snow. One gray day I noticed the striking silhouette of a dormant tree. It had taken the form of a jet black dancing woman. From that point on, I was inspired and trees have been a reoccurring image in my work. I admit it, I love them, and I am a tree-hugger.

Birds have become a regular feature of my work as a result of sailing in the Florida Everglades and Keys in the 80’s. Being at anchor was my favorite part of sailing. I was blessed to see thousands of migrating birds; egrets, herons, anhinga, and more. Once during a guided meditation on the bow of the ship, I saw a white bird, wing outstretched, and she said, “Always keep your wings ready. You never know where the winds will take you.” My acrylic work is an attempt to express my homesickness for Florida, missing blue when winter’s grey lingers.

A few years ago I had a near death experience that totally derailed me creatively. Finally, one of my friends, tired of hearing me whine, said, “Just draw.” Best advice ever. I put pen to paper and images naturally began to flow. This group of pen and ink drawings is very close to my heart. It represents a jumpstart to re-ignite my creative expression and begin anew. I hope you enjoy the show!” Janie

For more information on the artists, or to purchase art, please contact Black Lab Gallery at 1618 Hewitt Ave Everett, WA

The next Art Walk will be May 18,2017 6pm-10pm and every Third Thursday after from 6pm-10pm. Hope you can come join us for cookies and coffee and appreciate amazing local art with us!

 

Corianne Jensen

Art Curator

Third Thursday – Everett Art Walk April 20th

Floral design at Carl Gipson Sr. Ctr

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This Spring, explore Ikebana Floral Design with a free class presented by the floral designers at Solie Funeral Home. Come join us, have a snack, chat with friends and create a work of art! Spring is a time to appreciate things in nature that people often overlook because of their busy lives. Come join us to create your own floral design in the Japanese “Ikebana” style. Ikebana can inspire one to identify with beauty in all art forms. Spring is a time when we feel close to nature, which provides relaxation for the mind, body and soul. Join us and explore your inner floral designer. Celebrate the beauty of spring. Wednesday, April 12th from 10 to 11 am. Carl Gipson Senior Center 3025 Lombard Avenue, Everett Wa.

 

 

Everett’s Historic Rucker Mansion

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Hidden deep on the outskirts of Everett, overlooking the Port Gardner Bay, lies the Rucker Hill historic district, while filled with beautiful homes, this neighborhood holds Everett’s crown jewel, the Rucker house, better known as Rucker Mansion.

Built in 1905 the Rucker Mansion was first home to Jane Morris Rucker her two sons and one daughter in law. The Rucker’s were most noted for establishing the Everett Land Company which transformed the city of Everett into what the city has become today. The home is currently privately owned, and became part of the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.

Aside from the beautiful sight of Rucker Mansion, along the lengthy winding road that leads there,  a surprise awaits in the form of Rucker Hill Park, I would strongly encourage anyone who loves to watch sunrises or sunsets to check out the beautiful view. 

Both Artist and Mortician-Steve Jensen

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Solie blog update-August 21st, 2016-Director Holly Mattie visits the Museum of Northwest Art 121 South 1st St. LaConner, WA

Today started out cool and cloudy with the soft smell of lavender.  The perfect type of day to connect with the rich art of northwest locals. The Museum of Northwest Art sounded perfect.  Once I arrived, my friend and I were pleasantly surprised that there were no admission fees today and happily donated.  Upon circling the ground floor collections I discovered my favorite artist of the weekend. A one Mr. Steve Jensen has art on display at M.O.N.A. It is earthy and solid, yet sparkles in the light.  Some pieces even hang like ornaments from above. He has a story that covers the full rainbow of life and his art often honors a loved ones journey to the end.  I look forward to reading more on his beautiful yet, bold works.

Photos and summary by:
Holly Mattie

voyagerSteve Jensen-The Voyager Series

http://www.monamuseum.org/

http://www.cascadiaweekly.com/cw/currents/the_art_of_transition

My best friend Sylvain did a drawing of a boat. When he gave it to me, he asked if I would make a carved boat for his ashes when he passed. He died a month later and I carved a boat as close to Sylvain’s drawing as possible. My mother came to Sylvain’s funeral and was so moved by the boat I had made for Sylvain that she wanted my father’s remains placed in a similar vessel when he passed. Since he was a Norwegian fisherman and boat builder we buried the boat at sea, like a Viking funeral. Two years later when she passed, I created a boat for her and buried it at sea with my father. The day before John, my partner of twenty two years, passed, he asked me to make a boat for his ashes. His wish was to be buried at sea with my parents. In the course of eight years I had tragically lost and buried everyone close to me.

Since that time I have created funeral boats for friends, family, and pets. Art school never prepared me to work with human or animal ashes, but I feel honored to be asked and to have this opportunity. When I work with them, I feel transformed to another time or another place, an artist who has been asked to be both a craftsman and mortician.  I began the Voyager Series to help me deal with my own grief and loss, and with hope to provide relief for others dealing with their own sorrow.  I made this work as personal as possible because death is such a sensitive subject for many people.  I felt that by exposing myself and my family, the viewers of this work might feel more at ease.  Hopefully, for those who may be dealing with their own personal grief and loss, perhaps solace and insight can be found in this series.

I created the boats in this series approximately the same size as the actual boats used for burial. Carved in wood, painted or sculpted, this work is a direct result of these experiences. Death is the one final thing we all have in common. The universal image of a boat in many cultures and civilizations symbolizes a voyage, perhaps the voyage to the “other side”, or the journey into the unknown.

-Steve Jensen

 

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